Seeing Baseball Games in Japan – Part 1: Before you leave for Japan

You want to see baseball games in Japan? Having been there twice (with another trip scheduled for May 2020), I would say GO! While baseball is baseball, regardless of where it’s played, the Japanese passion for the game alone is worth the visit. A Japanese baseball is more like a college football game in the US, or a European soccer match. If you want a taste of what a Japanese game is like, check this out.

There are companies that specialize in Japanese baseball tours, such JapanBall Baseball Tours. The tours provide chaperones who know Japan, and provide tickets and activities while you are in Japan. If you are not comfortable traveling through a foreign country unescorted, this choice is probably for you. However, if you are a bit more adventurous, it IS possible to travel in a Japan to see the games without engaging the services of a tour group. My brother and I have done it twice, having never been overseas before.

The most important part of the trip is planning. Due to my brother Jeff’s careful and extensive research, we have some tips for putting together a baseball trip to Japan, including how to get tickets to games, getting around Japan using the amazing train system, as well as some insight about what we’ve learned about Japanese culture. Of course, the list we provide is by no means comprehensive, nor is it offered as such. Instead, it is a list of things we’ve learned that could help you to plan a trip to see Japanese baseball in person.


1. Check the Nippon Professional Baseball schedule to start planning your trip.

The definitive source for the schedule of Japanese baseball games is here. Of course, this site is in Japanese, but any modern browser should be able to translate the schedule competently. When viewing the schedule, it is important to note that the home team is on the left side under the Match Card header. To learn more about the teams and the cities they call home, check out the NPB home page.

Another good source for the NPB schedule is JapanBall Baseball Tours. That site breaks down the schedule to make it much easier to understand. The schedule there is colored coded, with additional information about the teams and their home cities.


2. Get your baseball tickets BEFORE you leave for Japan

Baseball is exceedingly popular in Japan, and all teams draw very well (the notable exception being the Orix Buffaloes in Osaka). While it is possible to get tickets from either box office at each park, or from ticket kiosks at 7-11 stores, that might end up being a disappointing strategy. For example, the Hiroshima Carp frequently sell out for the season long before the first pitch on Opening Day.

Attempting to get game tickets from the team website can be tricky. My brother used this site to follow step-by-step instructions to by tickets for the Hanshin Tigers. Purchasing tickets for the Tokyo Giants was fairly simple here. For other teams, the process of buying tickets can be daunting, if not impossible if you don’t read Japanese.

In order to avoid the disappointment, I’d suggest getting the tickets through a ticket broker. Be careful when choosing a vendor for the tickets. I had a VERY frustrating experience with Viagogo while trying to secure tickets for a game in Hiroshima. There are a few others that I have not tried, and cannot impart any intelligent review of their services.

Though it may sound biased (since I’ve mentioned this company twice so far), we have had a very good experience using japanballtickets.com. Using this website, we were able to select the numbers of tickets we needed (though we were not able to select our exact seats, as you can in the US) for each game we wanted to attend. We were quoted prices for the seats, and even received rebates when the tickets were obtained for less than the quoted price! For more information on tickets and pricing, check out the site above.

When ordering the tickets, you are prompted for an address in Japan to which the tickets will be delivered. You don’t need to do this immediately; when we purchased the tickets, we did not yet know where we would be staying in Japan. Once you know what hotel you will use, you can provide that information to them. The tickets for all of our games were delivered to the hotel in which we stayed the first night. We were VERY pleased with their services, and plan to use them again this year.


3. Traveling while you are in Japan

Early in our planning to visit Japan, we ruled out driving. Driving through busy streets on the left side of the road while trying to read road signs was not my idea of a vacation. My brother Jeff did extensive research about traveling in Japan, and decided the train system was the way to go. Part of that system in the bulletin train, or Shinkansen. Japan offers a significant discounts for visitors, much less than Japanese nationals would pay. You can buy 7, 14 and 21 days passes, depending on the length of your stay.

You can read about the JapanRail (JR) passes here. We recommend obtaining the Green Pass. This option allows you to make reservations for the bullet train, assuring your seats will be available for your excursions. While the prices may seem steep, this service is HIGHLY recommended. Just two trips on the bullet train pays for the pass, and we’ve traveled from Hokkaido in the north to Hiroshima in the south on the bullet train.

If you plans in Japan are firm, you might want to map out your travel on the Shinkansen BEFORE you leave. Since we knew the cities we would visit to see the games, my brother visited the JR sites (For trips from Tokyo and west, for trips from Tokyo and east) to plan the route we would take. He then used the information to make reservations for all of our travels within Japan on the bullet train at once.

There are a couple of things to know about the JapanRail pass. When you purchase the pass online (which you should do no more than 60 days before you arrive, but leave enough time to receive the information at home before you leave), you will receive an Exchange Order. The Exchange Order is the redeemed for the rail pass once in Japan. You can obtain the pass at any JR Exchange Office. You may want to a google the location of the JR Exchange office nearest to where you are staying; it may not be coincident with the nearest JR Office. We discovered this staying in Shinjuku. The processes takes about 20 minutes, at which time you can make reservations on the bullet trains during your stay.


4. Using money in Japan

Despite being a modern nation on the cutting edge of technology, Japan is still a largely cash society. More places are accepting credit cards, though these places may NOT accept foreign credit cards (we experienced ourselves at the Buffaloes team store in Osaka). You can check with your credit card company to see if their services are accepted in Japan.

In any event, we would recommend taking some Japanese currency (called yen) with you. You can get some yen from your bank before you go. The cash could help with purchasing train tickets from the airport to the city in which you are staying, for example. Once you arrive, you can obtain local currency at an ATM at any 7-11 store or Japanese post office (remember your card company will charge a fee for foreign transactions).


Task list

1. Check the NPB site or Japan Ball Travels for the NPB schedule to choose dates for your games.

2. Get you baseball tickets before heading to Japan. We recommend using Japan Ball Tickets to get your tickets.

3. Obtain your JR RailPass no more than 90 days before you plan to use it in Japan.

4. Get some yen for your trip. Check with your bank for more details.

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