Tokorozawa, Monday April 2, 2019

Our first stop on the 2019 Japanese baseball tour was Tokorozawa, on the northwest outskirts of Tokyo. Slated for an 1800 start, the Saitama Seibu Lions hosted the Chiba Lotte Marines at the MetLife Dome. The game marked the beginning of the season for both teams. After a cool day in Tokyo, temperatures were already plunging when we headed out from the hotel in Shinjuku to the ballpark.

1. Getting to the MetLife Dome

There is an old saying in the state of Maine (USA) about how to get somewhere. The saying states that there are a number of ways to get there, but none of them are good. That old saying could apply to getting to the MetLife Dome from Tokyo. There are a few train lines to the stadium, and each one requires at least three station and three train line changes. Needless to say, this trip is not for the faint of heart, especially if you are not comfortable with busy trains and stations.

A screen capture of the route we took from Shinjuku to Tokorozawa for the game. There are several possible routes to the staidum, and I am not sure which is the best. After some quick research in the Google Maps app, this is the route we chose.

From Shinjuku Station, we caught the Saikyo line to Ikebukuro Station. We were on this line for just one stop, reaching the Ikebukuro Station in about six minutes. Because of the game start time (1800), we were forced to travel during the beginning of the commute, which meant a packed car. From here, we changed to the Ikeburuko Line, headed for the Nishi-Tokorozawa Station. We were on this line for 27 minutes (four stops) before reaching the next station. At the Nishi-Tokorozawa Station, we changed to the Sayama Line to the Seibukyujo-Mae Station, and took it for two stops (about six minutes). From the station, it was a short walk to the stadium (less than 250 meters). The entire trip (included line and train changes) was about 51 minutes, and you should build in more than an hour to get the stadium.

A recap of the trip from Shinjuku Station to the Metlife Dome

  • Take the Saikyo Line from the Shinjuku Station to the Ikebukuro Station (one top, six minutes)
  • Take the Ikeburuko Line from the Ikebukuro Station to the Nishi-Tokorozawa Station (four stops, 27 minutes)
  • Take the Sayama Line from the Nishi-Tokorozawa Station to the Seibukyujo-Mae Station (two stops, six minutes)
  • The MetLife Dome is a short walk (less than 250 meters) from the Seibukyujo-Mae Station.

Best advice: use the Google Maps app to determine the best route from your starting point to the stadium BEFORE YOU LEAVE. This simple strategy could save you some frustration later. Be prepared for crowded trains if you travel near the commute, and leave yourself some time to find the train lines you need to catch at each station.

2. MetLife Dome

From the outside, the MetLife Dome looks as the name implies: a domed stadium.

The view of the MetLife Dome leaving the train station. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

However, upon further inspection, it becomes clear that this is not a typical domed stadium. The locals call the MetLife Dome the “stadium with an umbrella”. The stadium was built in 1979 without the dome, which was finished after the 1998 season. The dome covers the stadium, but unlike most domed stadiums in the US, it is open on all sides (hence the description “stadium with an umbrella”). This allows air into the stadium, and crosswinds as well.

Like most NPB ballparks, there is plenty to do and see outside the stadium. There are shops and food stands, and you could even have your picture taken with life like images of the Lions. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Most NPB ballparks have things to do and see outside the stadium, and the MetLife Dome was no different. There were plenty of places to eat and drink, as well as shops for home team apparel. In fact, I was able to get a Chiba Lotte Marines cap at one of the stands, even though they were the visiting team. Given the distance from Tokyo, it was not suprising that we did not see too many foreign faces, or hear much English spoken. After soaking in the atmosphere outside the park, we headed to the gate to enter the ballpark.

My ticket for the game. While I don’t read Japanese, we were able to determine the gate number, row and seats from the ticket.

Much like in the US, stadium security checks bags, but there does not seem to be a size limit to the bag you can bring into the park (as long as it does not get in the way of others). Concession stands were found shortly after walking in, and we decided to get something to drink. Being a distance from Tokyo, ordering was a challenge, since the staff at the concession stands did not seem comfortable with English. However, there was a picture menu available at the window, and I was able to get some water by pointing to it, and indicating how many waters with my fingers. Not an elegant approach, but it did the trick.

The view from our seats. You can see over the left field wall the opening to the outside. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

We were able to walk the concourse surrounding the playing field, taking pictures as we made the loop. We arrrived early enough to catch batting practice and fielding practice. The sun coming in from left field was nearly blinding at times, and wreaked havoc with throws from the outfield to the catcher. Even though it was just practice, many of the Lions players made impressive plays in the field, and throws to the plate.

Unbeknowst to us, this was the Opening Night of the 2019 season for both teams. The Lions won the NPB championship in 2018, and we were treated to the pagentry of Opening Night and the ceremony for winning the championship. Luckily, the festivites took place well ahead of the game start time, and at 1800 we were ready to start the game.

Lineup exchange at the plate just before game time. Note that the managers and umpires are dressed for the cold weather. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

While there were some foreign players in the lineup (there usually are), none of them were familiar. The open air nature of the of the stadium allowed a persistent 20 km/hour wind from the north to penetrate the field, and it became obvious early on that this was going to be a cold night in Tokorozawa. The wind was biting, make temperatures near 8 degress Celsius at game time feel much colder.

A scoreless tie through two innings was broken by the Lions, who scored one run in the third, and two runs in the fourth, fifth and sixth innings each, pushing the game out of reach for the Marines. The Marines did respond with runs in the sixth, seventh and eight, but not enough to overcome the deficit. The pace of play in NPB games is typically slower than MLB games (if that is even possible), and we had only reached the seventh inning by the time the game was three hours old.

A bang bang play at third. Though the call at third was safe, my brother’s picture clearly shows that the throw beat the runner. There is replay in NPB games, but this play did NOT generate a replay challenge. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

By the middle of the seventh inning (when the Japanese release balloons, rather than stretch), the cold had become pervasive. This die hard baseball fan had had enough of the cold, and we did something we have done just a handful of times in the past: leave before the end of the game. By this time, air temperatures were near 3 degrees Celsius, and wind chill values were below zero Celsius (possibly qualifying as the coldest baseball game I’ve ever attended). Having gotten the feel for the stadium and the environment (even in the cold, the fans chanted for every batter; you can get a sense of that here), we headed for the train.

We were hardly alone, as there was a steady stream of fans headed for the train station. This caused a bit of delay getting on the train, and once inside, we noticed that the cell signal was not that strong. Using Google Maps for directions became problematic, but fortunately we were able to recall the steps taken to get there, and reversed them to get back to hotel in Shinjuku.

Think baseball is big in Tokorozawa? (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

While the stadium was nice, with good sight lines and an excellent scoreboard in centerfield, the number of train changes, as well as the cold, lessened the enjoyment of the event. Because of these factors, I am not sure I will visit this stadium again.

Shinjuku, Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019

Shinjuku at night. Shinjuku is probably my favorite part of Tokyo..

1. Tokyo to Fukushima

Since we had time, and the JapanRail Pass at our disposal, the day started with a side trip to Fukushima. We intentionally left after the Tokyo morning commute, arriving at Tokyo Station after 0900. We boarded the Tohoku-Hokkaido Shinkansen bound for Fukushima station at 1000.

Shortly after leaving the Tokyo metro area, we were surrounded by rural Japan, interspersed with smaller towns along the way. Based on our speedometer apps, the bullet train topped out near 180 mph (300 kph). Visiting Fukushima aside, I simply enjoyed riding the train. The ride afforded us an opportunity to see parts of Japan we might otherwise miss.

The view from the train, traveling north toward Fukushima. The snow capped mountains in the distance reminded us that it was still winter in part of central Japan.

Sunshine in Tokyo was gradually replaced by clouds as we moved north. A cool start in Shinjuku turned into a winter’s day the further north we reached. The 93 minute trip felt like a trip back in time, as spring reverted to winter before our eyes. Not far outside of Fukushima, the sky became overcast, and the skies opened up. However, rather than a rain shower, we encountered a fairly vigorous snow shower.

Snow showers descending out of the mountains toward the train outside of Fukushima.

By the time we reached Fukushima, the sun was peeking out from behind the clouds. However, despite the weak early April sun, it was cold, with a stiff northwest wind making feel like mid January. We braved the cold to walk around the city. Fukushima, a city of a roughly 250,000, is about 10 miles from the exclusion zone following the earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

Despite arriving near midday, the city was curiously devoid of activity. Walking through central Fukushima, we encountered few people outside. Passing the local high school, we were greeted by some students, who insisted on high-fiving us as they passed. We’ve noticed in our travels that younger people will interact with us, while older Japanese tend to shy away.

Walking down the street from the station, we encountered an older Japanese woman. I fully expected her to walk by without even looking up, as we have seen in the past. However, as she approached us, her eyes brightened, smiled and warmly said “Good morning!” in English as she passed. I stopped in my tracks, as I was stunned. In the moment, I wondered when the last time she said good morning in English.

Domino’s in Fukushima. Not pictured here is the Denny’s just down the street. Almost reminds me of home. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

While we didn’t see many people on this cold afternoon, we did find some reminders of home down the street from the station. Seeing the American franchises in Fukushima, I couldn’t help but wonder if we were exporting something that could change the way the Japanese eat.

After walking through the streets of Fukushima for more than an hour, we headed back toward the train station for the trip back to Shinjuku. On the lower level of the station, there were shops and places to eat. Instead of a meal, we opted to get something from the convenience store there, then headed upstairs to track level.

A display in the Fukushima train proudly announcing that baseball and softball will be played here in the 2020 Olympics. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

On the track level, we discovered an impressive model train setup, as well as displaying touting the arrival of the world for baseball and softball with the Olympics in 2020. The Fukushima station was possibly the nicest train station we visited in Japan. Walking through the station to catch the train back to Tokyo, I couldn’t help but wonder if the quiet town of Fukushima was ready for what was coming in little more than a year.

2. Getting to the game in Shinjuku

Following the quick trip to Fukushima, we ate a late lunch and relaxed at the hotel before heading out to the game. Fortunately for us, our hotel was less than 3.5 kilometers from the park. Since there was not a clear path to walk there, we took the Chu-Sobu Line from Shinjuku Station to Meiji Jingu Station. The trip consisted of three stops, followed by a 1.1 kilometer walk from the Meiji Jingu Station to Mejij Jingu Stadium. After leaving the station, it was not clear how to get to the stadium. Once you leave the station, you need to cross UNDER the tracks and head up a gentle slope to reach the sidewalk on the other side.

Once you reach the top of the slope, you will see a stadium. When we were there in April of 2019, the stadium was under construction. This is NOT Meiji Jingu Stadium; it is a stadium for hosting events for the Olympics. You need to walk beyond this stadium, cross the street and walk a couple of blocks to arrive at Meiji Jingu Stadium. We managed the walk and search for the stadium with relative ease. However, if you are traveling with someone who has difficulty getting around, you may want to consider hailing a taxi at the train station.

On a side note, the entrance to Meiji Jingu Shrine is across the street from the sports complex. It is a picturesque park with the shrine in the middle. This is not a place to visit just before a game; the shrine grounds are too sprawling to attempt to cover shortly before a game. Instead, if your schedule allows it, visit the shrine when you have a couple of hours to devote to it.

Meiji Jingu Shrine in Shinjuku. The sprawling complex has several central buildings, as well as trails for hiking. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

3. Meiji Jingu Stadium

Like many NPB ballparks, the official team store for the Tokyo Yakult Swallows is not at the stadium. Actually, it about 250 meters BEFORE the stadium on the left hand side of the street. If you have trouble finding it, just follow the crowd. The store is VERY popular, and we suggest leaving some time to browse before heading to the park. Inside the store, we found the standard fare, with a good selection of apparel. My brother scored a colorful Swallows jersey, while I opted for a cap and yearbook (which is, of course, in Japanese). Don’t worry about taking your team store bags into the stadium; unlike MLB parks, the NPB parks are more lax when it comes to bringing bags into the stadium. You will, however, have to open your bag for security before entering the ballpark.

Following the mini shopping spree, we headed for the stadium just up the road. There was not much to see outside, so after a cursory look, we entered the ballpark. We were able to discern the gate through which we were supposed to enter, but after that we had to hand our tickets to stadium staff to help us to our seats.

The view from our seats in Meiji Jingu Stadium. Unlike most of the NPB games we’ve seen, this one was lightly attended. Perhaps the fact that the game time temperature for the 1800 start was about 5 Celisus (about 41 degrees Farenheit) had something to do with the small crowd. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

From the moment we decided to come to Japan to see baseball games, Meiji Jingu Stadium was on our radar. This ballpark is hallowed ground. Beside being the second oldest ballpark in Japan (having opened in 1926), it is one of four major league stadiums in which Babe Ruth played that are still in use (the others being Koshen Stadium near Kobe, Japan, Fenway Park in Boston, and Wrigley Field in Chicago). It should be noted that this distinction will disappear after the 2020 NPB baseball season. For the 2021 season, the Swallows move into the new stadium down the street constructed for use in the Olympics.

From the first view, it was clear that this stadium was a classic, a must see for baseball fans. Cozy by MLB standards, the stadium holds 35,000+ fans (and the seats are a tight fit for visitors), but on this night, there were nowhere near that many people in the seats. Just like night games in the US in April, you run the risk of conditions that are not ideal for watching a game. The temperature for the 1800 start was 41 F, under a perfectly clear sky. The Swallows hosted the Yokohoma DeNA BayStars (a team we would see at home later in the week).

For the exchange of the lineup cards, the managers, coaches and umpires were bundled up against the cold. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

There were some familiar names in the lineup for both teams. For the visiting BayStars, Neftalí Soto was batting second and playing RF. Soto played for the Reds in 2013/2014, and was in the Washington Nationals farm system as recently as 2017 (we saw him play as a member of the Harrisburg Senators).

Wladimir Balentien, the LF for the DeNA BayStars.

The Swallows lineup featured Nori Aoki (who played for the Royals, Giants and Mets in the MLB) batting second and playing CF. In LF was Wladimir Balentien, who played for the Reds and Mariners between 2007 and 2009. The Swallows struck first in bottom of the 1st inning with a single run. The BayStars responded with four runs in the top of the 4th inning, a lead they would protect through the middle innings. The relatively slow pace of the Japanese game, coupled with the very cold temperatures for a baseball game, had this veteran fan ready to call it a night in the 7th inning. My brother convinced me to brave the cold for just a bit longer, though I wasn’t so sure about that decision.

Despite the cold, the BayStars fans filled the left fields stands, the traditional seating for opponet fans at NPB parks. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The Swallows offense came to life on this cold night in the bottom of the 8th, as a three run homer by RF Yuhei Takai tied the game at 4. After a scoreless top of the 9th, the Swallows scored in the bottom of the 9th to win 5-4. The game clocked in at about three hours, which seems to be about average for an NPB game. The cold made it seem longer, but the Swallows comeback, and the crowd reaction to it, made sitting in the cold worth the effort.

RF Yuhei Takai receiving a Tsubakuro doll (the Swallows mascot) after hitting a three run homer to tie the game. It is customary for players to receive a doll after hitting a home run in Japan. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The ending was befitting of the venue. We feel fortunate to have visited Meiji Jingu Stadium, steeped in tradition and NPB history. It will be a sad day when the Swallows move out of this historic and beautiful ballpark for a new home just down the street.

Yokohama, Sunday April 7th, 2019

The last stop on our 2019 stadium tour brought us to Yokohama Stadium, the home of the Yokohama DeNA BayStars. Unlike the previous stops on the tour, the weather was much more agreeable, with a hint of spring in the air.


1. Getting to the game

The cherry blossoms were in full bloom in Tokyo. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

We did not go straight from our hotel in Tokyo to the stadium. After walking through Tokyo (admiring the cherry blossoms), we headed out in search the Seibu Lions team store in the Ikebukuro section of Tokyo. We took the Marunouchi line from Tokyo Station to Ikebukuro station, a journey of about 20 minutes. After a few false starts, we found the Seibu Department Store. The Lions team store was located on the 8th floor. The team store was surprisingly small, but my brother was able to get a Lions jersey.

From the Ikebukuro station, we took the Fukutoshin line to the Nihon-Odori station, with the trip taking about 50 minutes. From the station, it was a short walk (about 400 meters) to Yokohama Stadium.


2. Yokohama Stadium

It was a beautiful afternoon at Yokohama Stadium, as the DeNA BayStars took on the Tokyo Yomiuri Giants. We arrived about an hour before the 13:00 start, which gave us time to explore the surroundings. Unlike most Japanese ball parks, there wasn’t much to see outside the park, so after a cursory look outside we entered the ballpark.

Quite intentionally, the BayStars team store was located just beyond the gate. Of course, we perused the store, purchasing apparel and a yearbook (completely in Japanese). Prices here were higher than other team stores. For example a Giant cap sold for nearly 10,000 yen (about $100 USD). Not yet possessing a Giants cap, I was tempted, but ultimately passed on the opportunity.

The information on the ticket was barely discernible, so we heeded advice given early on to show our tickets to team employees until they showed us our seats. We sat on the left field side, beyond third base in the lower level. Even an hour before the game, the stadium was packed (which we found to be true just about everywhere in Japan).

The view from our seats. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Just before of the start of the game, there was an audible murmur in the crowd, as a young man walked out to the mound to throw out to the first pitch. The crowd clearly knew who he was, though we didn’t have a clue. The young man was a member of a J-Pop band, whose name escapes me.

A celebrity throwing out the first pitch. We later learned he was a member of a J-Pop band. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The lineups were announced before the start of the game. Quite unexpectedly, the lineup announcements were in English, which was a first at an NPB game. In fact, the announcements sounded as though they were being made in an American ballpark. The English continued for each at bat, a nice touch for a foreign baseball fan. Unlike the other ballgames we saw in Japan, there were many foreign fans in attendance. Our entire row was comprised of Americans, except for the Giants fans sitting next to us.

Very MLB like scoreboard in Yokohama.

The visiting Giants had a large cheering section in left field (as is customary in Japan). The section sang a different song for each player. Being the third time we’d seen the Giants, we actually recognized the batters by the fight song chanted by the fans.

The Giants fans cheered loudly when the Giants were at bat, from the 1st inning through the 9th. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Not to be outdone, the remainder of the stadium chanted for the BayStars in the bottom of the 1st inning. Having been to eight NPB games, it still amazes me that the fans have the stamina to maintain the cheering the entire game (want to hear the chanting? Check it out here.) The fans, the warm weather, and the ballpark made this my favorite stop on our NPB baseball tour (though my brother would disagree).

The BayStars fans cheering for their team. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The game itself was fairly one-sided, with the BayStars taking an early lead and holding on for a 5-1 victory. Rather than stretch during the middle of the 7th inning, the Japanese have another tradition we’ve seen at every ballpark so far. Fans inflated balloons and released them when instructed. The resulting display is quite colorful, and view a montage of balloon tradition is available here.

Like most other ball games in Japan, we saw some foreign players, though none of names were familiar. Seemingly, most of the foreign players were fireballers, with fastballs over 95 mph (a skill homegrown pitchers did not appear to possess on a consistent basis).

DeNA BayStars left hander Edwin Escobar. Escobar had brief stints with the Red Sox and Diamondbacks. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The game time was a reasonable two hours and 45 minutes, the shortest game we saw on this trip. Typically, NPB games last between three and three and one-half hours. However, unlike the US, nobody in Japan seems to mind. For the Japanese, baseball is more than a game; it’s an event.

The pageantry of NPB baseball. (Photo credit; Jeff Hayes)

Seeing Baseball Games in Japan – Part 2: Traveling in Japan

In the previous post, we covered some of the aspects of planning the trip we felt were important to prepare you for the journey. In this post, we will review some of the things we discovered about traveling while you are in Japan. Hopefully these tips can make your travels easier.


1. Getting to where you are staying from the airport

If you arrive at Narita Airport (where most international flights arrive), the best place to get to where you are staying is the Narita Express. This limited express train gets you from Narita to Tokyo area locations. You can make reservations online, which is remitted at Narita, or you can make the reservation once you arrive in Japan.

We recommend Googling the station nearest your hotel, and determining the distance between the two. If you are unsure of how to get to the hotel from the train station, we recommend taking a taxi. Tell the driver the name of your hotel, and they will know how to get there. The taxi stands are clearly marked, though it is possible that some cabbies may shy away from transporting foreigners (try not to take it personally). Taking a taxi after a long flight might be the easiest way to conclude your travel day.


2. Using Mobile Devices in Japan

During our previous two trips to Japan, we simply used our phones with an international data plan from Verizon. The plan, for $10 USD a day, we made calls, texted and surfed the Web, using Verizon partner networks. Each day we used data on our phones, we were charged the $10; if we didn’t, we were not charged. Our 8 day stays therefore cost $80 for data, text and call. In most places, the cell coverage was sufficient to meet our needs. However, there were times when the drop off in coverage caused some issues using a Google Maps while using the Tokyo area trains.

In preparation for our upcoming return to Japan, I have been researching alternatives. Using a SIM card with my locked iPhone appears to be more of a hassle than it’s worth, but others have been ingenious to work with the iPhone to get the SIM cards to work.

The other alternative seems more attractive: a portable WiFi router. Research points to the same provider as being the best in Japan: Japan Wireless. For our 8 day visit, the cost would be about $60 USD. When we experiment with this option during our next rip, we will provide more information.


3. Using Tokyo area trains

If you plan to use train services in the city in which you’re staying, get a Suica card. The card can be obtained at any JR East station, and can be used on JR East trains, subways and buses, as well as some vending machines and taxis. We found the card to be invaluable when navigating the subway. On our first trip to Tokyo, we used tickets obtained at a kiosk. This approach meant accurately determining your destination beforehand, and tabulating the cost before getting the tickets. This approach proved cumbersome, and my brother’s research provided a better alternative.

The Suica card can be purchased at any JR Rail or local/regional train station, at the black kiosks, which have English buttons. You can preload any amount up to 10,000 yen (which is roughly $100 USD), and you are ready to go. The Suica card can be used at any turnstile labeled with IC, even if it is Passmo or other service is in the area, as well as any Tokyo Metro train. Just swipe the card as you enter the station, and swipe out as you exit (much like metro areas in the US). The card doesn’t expire, and you can reload the card at the train station as well.

Make sure you have Google Maps on your phone before you get to Japan. We discovered that this app provides incredibly detailed information about train service. For example, after choosing your starting point and destination, selecting the train option tells you which train to catch, on which platform and when the next train arrives

Type in your starting point (if it’s not your current location) and your destination. Google Maps will offer a few ways to get there.
After choosing one of the routes, Google Maps provides very detailed instructions for getting to your destination.

It might save you some time and stress if you review your route choices in Google Maps BEFORE you travel. Japanese trains stations can be difficult to navigate, even for locals. Leave yourself some time to acquaint yourself with the station, and don’t be surprised if you experience some frustration trying to navigate the station. Don’t worry too much; you’ll figure it out.

Finally, it is worth noting (for people who have difficulty getting around) that there are not many places to sit in Japanese train stations. Fortunately, there are usually escalators within the stations, but you can still expect to have to climb stairs in Japan.


4. Using the Bullet Train (Shinkansen)

If you have not done so , you want to plan your travels on the Shinkansen. Japan Rail (JR) operates bullet trains on JR East and JR Central, the lines you are mostly like to use. As mentioned earlier, there are two good sites to use when planning your travels (for travel from Tokyo and east, for travel from Tokyo and west).

Map of the Japan Rail bullet train routes

To begin your journey on the bullet train, take your JapanRail pass and make a reservation at the nearest JR Rail Ticket Office (or Travel Service Center). Tell the representative the your destination and preferred travel time, and you will be issued a ticket for a reserved seat. For a Green Card holders, your reservation will be in a first class car, which are typically less crowded and quieter (which, for me, was worth the upgrade). Making a reservation guarantees you seat; otherwise, you may not get a seat on the train car you wish.

Check the information boards for your track (if the representative does not tell you). From what I’ve seen, all of the train information is displayed in Japanese AND English. Head to the gate, and once you arrive, keep to the right of the turnstiles. Show your JapanRail Pass to the JR representative, who will wave you through. At the gate, you will see lines on the floor, showing you where to stand for entry into your car number (listed on the ticket). If you have a Green Card, there is a good chance you will need to look for Car 8.

Once aboard, find your seat. If you are carrying luggage, be aware that you can carry 2 pieces of baggage on JR trains. The total of height+width+depth of each item must be under 250 cm and the weight less than 30 kg per bag. This is because there is limited overhead storage space in the cars. Starting in May 2020, if you have oversized luggage, you must make a reservation for a seat with oversized storage (which is free)

The Japanese are immensely proud of their train system, and it shows. People from around the world come to Japan just to ride the bullet train. The accommodations are comfortable, and the ride smooth and quiet. Most cars have power outlets for charging devices, and some of the trains offer drinks and snacks. Phone conversations are discouraged; if you need to make a call, head to the vestibule.

Service announcements aboard the train are in Japanese and English, as is the signage. Announcements concerning the next stop occur well ahead of time. Timeliness is a staple of the bullet train, and each announcement ask you to be prepared to exit the car BEFORE the train reaches the station.


Task list

1. Look for the Narita Express once you land in Japan. You might want to check out the website to find the stop closest to where you are staying beforehand.

2. Determine how to use your phone to communicate in Japan. We used our Verizon iPhones with the International plan, but obtaining a WiFi router may be a cheaper and better alternative.

3. Get a Suica card as soon as possible. It helps traveling on Tokyo area travels better. Also use Google Maps to make navigating the train routes much easier.

Seeing Baseball Games in Japan – Part 1: Before you leave for Japan

You want to see baseball games in Japan? Having been there twice (with another trip scheduled for May 2020), I would say GO! While baseball is baseball, regardless of where it’s played, the Japanese passion for the game alone is worth the visit. A Japanese baseball is more like a college football game in the US, or a European soccer match. If you want a taste of what a Japanese game is like, check this out.

There are companies that specialize in Japanese baseball tours, such JapanBall Baseball Tours. The tours provide chaperones who know Japan, and provide tickets and activities while you are there. If you are not comfortable traveling through a foreign country unescorted, this choice is probably for you. However, if you are a bit more adventurous, it IS possible to travel in a Japan to see the games without engaging the services of a tour group. My brother and I have done it twice, having never been overseas before.

The most important part of the trip is planning. Due to my brother Jeff’s careful and extensive research, we have some tips for putting together a baseball trip to Japan, including how to get tickets to games, getting around Japan using the amazing train system, as well as some insight about what we’ve learned about Japanese culture. Of course, the list we provide is by no means comprehensive, nor is it offered as such. Instead, it is a list of things we’ve learned that could help you to plan a trip to see Japanese baseball in person.


1. Check the Nippon Professional Baseball schedule to start planning your trip.

The definitive source for the schedule of Japanese baseball games is here. Of course, this site is in Japanese, but any modern browser should be able to translate the schedule competently. When viewing the schedule, it is important to note that the home team is on the left side under the Match Card header. To learn more about the teams and the cities they call home, check out the NPB home page.

Another good source for the NPB schedule is JapanBall Baseball Tours. That site breaks down the schedule to make it much easier to understand. The schedule there is colored coded, with additional information about the teams and their home cities.


2. Get your baseball tickets BEFORE you leave for Japan

Baseball is exceedingly popular in Japan, and all teams draw very well (the notable exception being the Orix Buffaloes in Osaka). While it is possible to get tickets from either box office at each park, or from ticket kiosks at 7-11 stores, that might end up being a disappointing strategy. For example, the Hiroshima Carp frequently sell out for the season long before the first pitch on Opening Day.

Attempting to get game tickets from the team website can be tricky. My brother used this site to follow step-by-step instructions to by tickets for the Hanshin Tigers. Purchasing tickets for the Tokyo Giants was fairly simple here. For other teams, the process of buying tickets can be daunting, if not impossible if you don’t read Japanese.

In order to avoid the disappointment, I’d suggest getting the tickets through a ticket broker. Be careful when choosing a vendor for the tickets. I had a VERY frustrating experience with Viagogo while trying to secure tickets for a game in Hiroshima. There are a few others that I have not tried, and cannot impart any intelligent review of their services.

Though it may sound biased (since I’ve mentioned this company twice so far), we have had a very good experience using japanballtickets.com. Using this website, we were able to select the numbers of tickets we needed (though we were not able to select our exact seats, as you can in the US) for each game we wanted to attend. We were quoted prices for the seats, and even received rebates when the tickets were obtained for less than the quoted price! For more information on tickets and pricing, check out the site above.

When ordering the tickets, you are prompted for an address in Japan to which the tickets will be delivered. You don’t need to do this immediately; when we purchased the tickets, we did not yet know where we would be staying in Japan. Once you know what hotel you will use, you can provide that information to them. The tickets for all of our games were delivered to the hotel in which we stayed the first night. We were VERY pleased with their services, and plan to use them again this year.


3. Traveling while you are in Japan

Early in our planning to visit Japan, we ruled out driving. Driving through busy streets on the left side of the road while trying to read road signs in Japanese was not my idea of a vacation. My brother Jeff did extensive research about traveling in Japan, and decided the train system was the way to go. Part of that system is the bulletin train, or Shinkansen. Japan offers a significant discounts for visitors, much less than Japanese nationals would pay. You can buy 7, 14 and 21 days passes, depending on the length of your stay.

You can read about the JapanRail (JR) passes here. We recommend obtaining the Green Pass. This option allows you to make reservations for the bullet train, assuring your seats will be available for your excursions. While the prices may seem steep, this service is HIGHLY recommended. Just two trips on the bullet train pays for the pass, and we’ve traveled from Hokkaido in the north to Hiroshima in the south on the bullet train.

If you plans in Japan are firm, you might want to map out your travel on the Shinkansen BEFORE you leave. Since we knew the cities we would visit to see the games, my brother visited the JR sites (For trips from Tokyo and west, for trips from Tokyo and east) to plan the route we would take. He then used the information to make reservations for all of our travels within Japan on the bullet train at once.

There are a couple of things to know about the JapanRail pass. When you purchase the pass online (which you should do no more than 60 days before you arrive, but leave enough time to receive the information at home before you leave), you will receive an Exchange Order. The Exchange Order is the redeemed for the rail pass once in Japan. You can obtain the pass at any JR Exchange Office. You may want to Google the location of the JR Exchange office nearest to where you are staying; it may not be coincident with the nearest JR Office. We discovered this staying in Shinjuku. The processes takes about 20 minutes, at which time you can make reservations on the bullet trains during your stay.


4. Using money in Japan

Despite being a nation on the cutting edge of technology, Japan is still a largely cash society. More places are accepting credit cards, though these places may NOT accept foreign credit cards (we experienced ourselves at the Buffaloes team store in Osaka). You can check with your credit card company to see if their services are accepted in Japan.

In any event, we would recommend taking some Japanese currency (called yen) with you. You can get some yen from your bank before you go. The cash could help with purchasing train tickets from the airport to the city in which you are staying, for example. Once you arrive, you can obtain local currency at an ATM at any 7-11 store or Japanese post office (remember your card company will charge a fee for foreign transactions).


Task list

1. Check the NPB site or Japan Ball Travels for the NPB schedule to choose dates for your games.

2. Get you baseball tickets before heading to Japan. We recommend using Japan Ball Tickets to get your tickets.

3. Obtain your JR RailPass no more than 90 days before you plan to use it in Japan.

4. Get some yen for your trip. Check with your bank for more details.

North Carolina, June 15th and 16th, 2019

The first mini road trip on the 2019 baseball season in the United States took place on the weekend of June 15th/16th 2019. My brother came down to Maryland the night before, and our trip began after 900 am Saturday morning. Google mapped out a 250 mile trip in a little more than four hours, placing us at the hotel outside Durham, NC in the early afternoon. Following lunch in VA about halfway through the trip, we stopped at Target store to purchase a clamp for my GoPro Hero 7 Black camera.

We found the clamp quickly, but waited for what seemed like an infinity on line to buy it. Lines simply weren’t moving, and nobody in the store appeared to know why. There were whispers of problems with the registers, and we were informed by management that Target’s online presence was also offline. Not wanting to waste any more time waiting, we left the store. Google informed us there was another Target nearby, so we headed there. Before we could get to the door, someone told us that the store was closed, due to register problems. We read later than Target’s entire system was down nationwide for nearly two hours, just as we tried to buy a part.

We found the part at an adjacent Best Buy, and we were on our way. The delay placed us nearly an hour behind, and we didn’t reach the hotel until nearly 400 pm. Luckily, the weather was wonderful, warm with relatively low humidity. Not being a fan of heat or humidity, my worst fears of what we might encounter in NC in mid June went unfounded.

Durham Bulls Athletic Park, home plate entrance, June 15th 2019. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The stadium was about 15 minutes from the hotel, ensconced in downtown Durham. Like most urban ballparks, there was parking offsite, and we found a garage that was reasonably priced. Typically, we are wary of parking in multiple level garages, which can result in a VERY long wait at the end of the game. Since we had some time before the gates opened, we explored the environs adjacent to the ballpark. As is the case with urban parks, the area was filled with shops, bars and restaurants, and it seemed as though this location was in the process of renovation.

Before going into the park, we looked through the team store. On the wall next to the store were plaques of retired Bulls numbers. Of course, not being a Bulls fan, we did not recognize the numbers and the significance behind them. However, there WAS a number we did recognize. Any fan of the movie Bull Durham would know this number instantly.

Photo credit: Jeff Hayes

Once inside the team store, there were MANY references to the movie (not surprisingly), with Crash Davis and Nuke Laloosh jerseys for sale. To be sure, I expected some nod to the movie, but this was more than I anticipated. However, I’m sure that the merchandise with these names sell very well here, as fans take home a little piece of the movie.

We entered the ballpark at the home plate gate, and conducted our typical pre game tour of the stadium. While this is NOT the same stadium from the movie, Durham Bulls Athletic Park is a beautiful park. Even though this wasn’t the park from the movie, there WAS a familiar site in left field.

The snorting bull in left field at Durham Bulls Athletic Park in Durham NC. According to Wikipedia, this is NOT the bull from the movie Bull Durham (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

In Durham Bulls Athletic Park, the snorting bull is located in left field; in Bull Durham, the bull was in right field. There were no other obvious nods to the past, but this park didn’t need them. It stands on its own as a great minor league experience.

Typically, we select seats for baseball games in a particular manner. The preferred location is in the lower level between home plate and third or first base. These seats are best for taking pictures, and depending on the stadium, the best view of the field. If these seats are not available, we prefer to be higher, as close to home plate as possible. This usually occurs at major league parks with strong fan bases.

For this park, we chose seats in the lower level, right behind home plate. Because of the netting, these seats are worse for taking pictures, but here, it offered an amazing view of a beautiful ballpark. Like many urban ballparks we have visited, there were condominiums in left center field. If I worked in the area, I’d certainly have to investigate the feasibility of living in one of these homes.

The view from our seats at Durham Bulls Athletic Park, June 15th, 2019. Though the net did not afford the best picture taking, the seats DID give us the best view of the park (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

While we knew the Bulls’ opponent for this game would be the Scranton Wilkes-Barre RailRiders (the AAA affiliate of the New York Yankees), what we didn’t know is that there would be two major leaguers on rehab assignments tonight. Both Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton were in the lineup, batting first and second, respectively. Based on the buzz from the crowd, they were fully aware these players would be here. Of course, the two players were fully cognizant of the attention they would garner, and made sure they were in view of the crowd at every opportunity.

In fact, Judge signed autographs near the on deck circle before each at bat. Normally, even at the minor league level, this behavior is either strongly discouraged or outright forbidden. Given the situation, it seemed as though the Bulls’ management was content to look the other way, especially since it did not interfere with play. Each hitter had four at bats, with Judge DHing and Stanton in left field. Though neither player had a hit tonight, most fans didn’t seem to mind. Their mere presence was enough to make the fans’ night.

Aaron Judge (foreground) and Giancarlo Stanton (background) posing before hitting in the top of the 1st inning. Think these guys knew they were being photographed and videoed??? (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The RailRiders had a couple of other major leaguers in the lineup, as well as a few players that have been rising through the Yankees minor league system. My brother lives near Arm&Hammer Park, home of the Yankees AA team in Trenton, NJ, and he saw a few of these players there recently. We did not recognize many of the players in the Bulls lineup (the Durham Bulls are the AAA affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays) . The game itself was a tight affair, with the RailRiders starter Raynel Espinal allowing one runs in six innings of work.

A snippet of Aaron Judge’s at bat in the third inning.

The Bulls starter, Jake Croneworth, pitched the first inning, followed by four reliever. The quintet blanked the RailRiders on just two hits. The Bulls tacked on a run in the 7th, winning the game 2-0.

Photo credit: Jeff Hayes

After the game, we headed back to the hotel, ending a long day of travel and baseball.


Sunday, June 16th

Our next stop on the abbreviated road trip was High Point, NC, home of the High Point Rockers. The Rockers are the newest franchise in the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball. High Point is about an hour from Durham, and since the game didn’t start until 205 pm, we had time in the morning to explore the area. Our target was Eno River State Park, located in Durham. Walking paths located adjacent to the parking lot made for easy access to the park. The portion of the park we visited contained the remains of the Cole Mills, along the banks of the river.

One of the buildings near the old Cole Mill.

We walked along the river, reaching a waterfall. Beyond the waterfall, the river continued upstream into a field ringed by pine trees. While we didn’t see much in the way of wildlife on our journey, we did find some turtles sunning themselves on fallen tree trunks. These particular turtles were very skittish, plopping into the water whenever we made sounds, or wandered too close to the riverbank. Following several attempts to get better looks at the turtles (during which time all of the remaining turtles jumped into the water), we headed back up the trail, leaving the turtles in peace.

Turtles enjoying the sunshine in Eno River State Park. Shortly after this picture was taken, these two dropped into the water as we got too close. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Wandering down the path, we enjoyed the warm but dry morning, splashed by wall to wall sunshine. Despite the beautiful weather, there were few others in the park. Before we knew it, we’d spent more than an hour there. After crossing a bridge spanning the river, we headed back toward the parking lot. Before leaving, we made one last visit to the waterfall. The serenity of the waterfall was inviting, and we spent some time there before getting back on the road. If there was more time, we could have spent the morning there. If you are in the area, I highly recommend a visit.

Driving along Interstate 40 toward High Point, we realized we would be passing fairly close to Greensboro. Originally, we attempted to fit Greensboro into the schedule for this weekend, but the Grasshoppers were out of town. Since we were nearby, we decided to make a quick stop to see the stadium. Located in downtown Greensboro, First National Bank Field is the home of the Grasshoppers, the South Atlantic League single A affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

When we arrived, that portion of Greensboro was very quiet at noon. Even though the Grasshoppers were away, the ballpark was in use, and apparently open to the public. Assuming that to be true, we entered the park to see a game in progress. There were no outward signs of the names of the teams playing, nor what league they were in. Like any other park we’ve visited, we wandered around the ballpark, taking pictures along the way.

First National Bank Field in Greensboro, NC. Just like other ballparks in urban areas we’ve visited, there are condominiums lining the right field fence. The ballpark was beautiful in the day time; it seems as though it is even more attractive at night. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

After spending about 30 minutes at First National Bank Field, we continued on our way to High Point, reaching the stadium about an hour before the scheduled start time. BB&T Point is the home of the High Point Rockers, the newest addition to the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball. The ballpark is located on the edge of downtown High Point, surrounded by commercial property .

BB&T Point, home of the High Point Rockers. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Parking was a bit confusing, as there did not seem to be a dedicated parking lot at the park. We arrived early enough to park on the street, but even that option came with some question marks. We opted to park in a private lot across the street, and parking was reasonable ($5.00). We walked over to the nearest gate to enter the ballpark not long after arriving, as gates open about an hour before game time.

However, the gates did NOT open on time. With an increasingly restless crowd waiting at the gate, fans were finally allowed to enter less than 30 minutes before first pitch. The late entrance left us little time for our pre-game ballpark tour, but we managed to take pictures before heading to the seats. The obligatory stop at the third base concession stand provided standard ballpark fare. My hot dogs were fried, but ultimately tasty, without the aftertaste common to ballpark dogs.

Inside BB&T Point, home of the Rockers. Note the surface is AstroTurf; both the “grass” and “dirt” are turf. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

One of the aspects of the ballpark that caught our attention was the playing surface. Many newer ballparks have some version of turf, but BB&T Point had something we’ve never seen before. Not only was the “grass” made of AstroTurf, so was the “dirt” portion of the field (including the mound and batters boxes). Presumably an attempt to mitigate maintenance costs, the unique field was as attractive as it was interesting. The weather was pleasantly warm for the 205 pm start, as we took our seats in the lower level on the third base side. Much like we’ve seen elsewhere, the Sunday afternoon game was lightly attended, which is odd considering this is the inaugural season for the Rockers.

The Rockers’ opponent this afternoon was the Long Island Ducks. The Ducks have a strong connection to the New York Mets (our favorite squadron). The connection starts with manager Wally Backman, the 2nd baseman for the 1986 world championships, and coach Ed Lynch, a starter for the Mets in the 1980s. The starting lineup for the Ducks featured former Met outfielder Kirk Nieuwenhuis, and former Met farmhand LJ Mazzilli (son of perennial fan favorite Lee Mazzilli).

Rockers pitcher Seth Simmons delivers a pitch during his start against the Long Island Ducks. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The game was tied 2-2 entering the bottom of the 10th. The Atlantic League, like Minor League Baseball, starts every extra half-inning with the batter who made the last out in the previous inning placed at 2nd base. This rule change was implemented to spur scoring in extra innings, in hopes of shortening games. In this case, the rule change worked, as the runner placed at 2nd base scored on a single, giving the Rockers 3-2 win.

My brother’s picture of the action from centerfield at BB&T Point. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

With a long drive back to Maryland ahead of us, we did not linger at the ballpark long. Overall, the experience was enjoyable; a very good game at an interesting ballpark. If you find yourself in the area, the ballpark is worth the visit, if for no other reason than to see the unique playing surface. However, the sustainability of Atlantic League baseball in High Point may be difficult, even with a brand new ballpark. There are other baseball options within driving distance, and from just one visit, it was tough to determine the level of baseball interest in the area.

Cleveland Ohio to Altoona Pennsylvania August 6th 2019

After spending the night in Independence, OH, our next stop was Altoona, PA, home of the Curve. Since we had some time before getting on the road to Altoona, we made another trip back into Cleveland. Waiting until after the morning commute, we visited Edgewater Park, along the shore of Lake Erie.

Cleveland Ohio from Edgewater Park, on a muggy morning, August 6 2019. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

During our last visit in 2000, the cold and lack of time prevented us from seeing Lake Erie. On previous trips, we’d seen the shores of Lake Michigan (in Milwaukee) and Lake Ontario (in Toronto), and time afforded us the opportunity to see the lakefront on a warm and humid morning. As was the case with the other Great Lakes we’ve seen, the lake extended to the horizon, much like the view of the ocean from the beach. Being August, the wind off the water didn’t provide much relief from the building heat, as we explored a largely deserted lakefront.

However, the lakefront was not completely empty. Standing on the lake’s edge, we saw something bobbing on the waves. From a distance, it was difficult to identify. As brother ventured closer, he was able to see what was coming ashore.

A reptilian local came to greet us on the shore of Lake Erie. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

It would be difficult to understate my surprise at the prospect of a snake coming ashore right in front of us. The snake, between three and four feet long, got within a few feet of us, before slithering back into the lake. Some checking identified it as a northern water snake, which bore a striking resemblance to the water moccasin. Northern water snakes are non-venomous, and the water moccasin (which can be found in my home state of NJ) are definitely venomous and can be deadly. Not being able to top that, we left the park and started on our way to Altoona.


The drive to Altoona was rather uneventful, as traffic was generally light. A quick bite at a local diner along the way was the only stop, and we reached the hotel just outside of town before 500 pm. By that time, clouds were building on the horizon, a harbinger of things to come.

Building cumulus at the hotel outside of Altoona PA.

After a 15 minute drive from the hotel, we arrived at People’s Natural Gas Field, home of the Altoona Curve, the AA affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates. Nestled among the ridges of the Allegheny Mountains, the 7200 seat stadium is famous for its roller coaster in right field. Most of the die hard baseball fans with whom I’ve spoken said this stadium was a must see, and shortly after arriving, it was clear why.

People’s Natural Gas Field in Altoona, PA, shortly before game time. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

We wandered the park from foul pole to foul pole, soaking in the ambience of this beautiful minor league park. Sitting along the 3rd base line, we had an unobstructed view of the mound. However, the burgeoning clouds at the hotel continued to build, and soon thunderstorms began to develop on the ridge lines behind centerfield. As the 630 pm game versus the Richmond Flying Squirrels (AA affiliate of the San Francisco Giants) began, the storms swept toward the park, threatening from the first pitch.

Pedro Vasquez facing the Richmond Flying Squirrels in the first inning, August 6th 2019. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Just after the top of the first inning, the skies opened up. One of the thunderstorms on the ridge tops descended upon the field, bringing with it torrential rain and gusty winds. The heaviest of the rain lasted about 30 minutes, after which time the ground crew took to the field. In a VERY impressive display of teamwork, the crew removed the tarp, then started to tend to the infield. Even though the tarp was placed on the infield quickly, there was still a fair amount of water ponded on the foul lines, especially behind third base.

People seemingly came out of nowhere to tackle the problem of the drenched field. One of the ushers (whose name escapes me) told us that the front office personnel were lending a hand, and that the team’s general manager was tossing diamond dust on the infield near third base.

Umpires inspecting the damage done to the base line by the torrential rain. A superb effort by the ground crew and the front office personnel turned this into a playable field in 45 minutes. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The rain delayed totaled 45 minutes, and the Herculean effort of the crew returned the drenched field into a playable surface. The teams returned to the field for the top of the 2nd inning, though storms continued to lurk nearby. A one-two-three top of the second inning was followed by yet another storm. This time, the storm won the evening, and the game was postponed before 800 pm. All told, we saw 10 batters come to the plate in one and one-half innings. Disappointed, we left the park, headed back to the hotel as the rain stopped and breaks in the clouds appeared.

Because of our travel schedule, we would not be able to stay for the completion of the game the next night. Despite the rain out, we felt fortunate to visit the field. People’s Natural Gas Field richly deserved its reputation as one of the best ballparks in the Eastern League.

Cleveland, Ohio, August 5th 2019

Following our stay in Akron, we made the short trip to Independence, where we stayed the night. Our plan was to visit Progressive Field for a 705 pm game between the Texas Rangers and Cleveland Indians. It is our first visit to Cleveland since 2000, when the stadium was called Jacobs Field.

Cleveland’s Jacobs Field on a cold, drizzly afternoon in May 2000. This picture was taken with a film camera, back before I owned a digital camera. Unfortunately the quality of the image shows that clearly.

A short drive into Cleveland brought us to the lakefront, where we wondered along the lake’s edge, waiting for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to open at 1000 am. The morning was warm and muggy, and by 1000 am I was ready to get out of the heat. Even before the Hall opened, crowds were gathering outside, complicating the opportunity to get a clear shot of the front of the Rock Hall.

Outside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame just before 1000 am, Monday, August 5th, 2019. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

We had been to the Hall once before, during our last visit to Cleveland back in 2000. Since the Hall frequently changes exhibits, we fully expected a much different experience this time around. Walking among the exhibits and memorabilia, there was a palpable sense of music history. However, it seemed as though there were fewer exhibits than in 2000, and worst of all, there was no Led Zeppelin exhibit!!! For most people, that wouldn’t be that big a deal, but being a lifelong Zeppelin fanatic, this omission was unforgivable.

Again, it is understandable that some performers are underrepresented. There is only so much space in the museum, and rotating exhibits gives visitors the best viewing experience. The Beatles and Rolling Stones exhibits were well done, as was the exhibit for The Beach Boys.

The Beatles represented in the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Still, the Hall seemed to have less charm and content of the last visit. Perhaps I’m being too critical with my review of the Hall; any true Rock and Roll fan should make the pilgrimage here when near Cleveland. In contrast, despite its humble appearance, Sun Studios in Memphis had a much better feel, in my opinion. That place has a PRESENCE that the Hall seemed to lack. In any event, it was time well spent.

After lunch back closer to Independence, we took in a movie before relaxing in advance of the game. We saw Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Being a Tarantino fan, I enjoyed the movie immensely. In true Tarantino style, he took a fairly well known story and made it his own, complete with a rewrite of history at the end.


Progressive Field

Ahead of the 705 pm game time, we arrived at Progressive Field around the time of the evening commute. Traffic heading to the ballpark was manageable, which made finding parking fairly easy. Prices just a block from the park was very reasonable ($20) especially for an urban setting. The downside of the parking adjacent to the park was that we were packed in like sardines, making me wonder how easily we might escape after the game. Considering the parking nightmares in other cities (yeah, I’m looking at you Philadelphia, though it has gotten better with the new stadium), we felt fortunate to finding parking so easily.

As is our custom, we walked around the stadium before entering. We were here nearly 20 years ago, so my memory of the surroundings is fuzzy at best. In any event, the outside of the stadium was nicer than I remember, but the last time we were here, I was more concerned about staying warm than enjoying the view.

Outside Progressive Field about an hour before game time, Monday, August 5th, 2019. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Walking around the inside of the park, we found a nugget I didn’t expect to find. Just after entering through the centerfield gate, we saw a space suit. Upon closer inspection, we found that it was a mock-up of the one worn by Ohio native son Neil Armstrong. A lifelong obsession with NASA and space travel, the suit was a pleasant surprise ensconced within another lifelong obsession (baseball, of course!!!). In fact, it might have been my favorite part of the visit to the park.

A recreation of the suit worn by Neil Armstrong in 1969. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

We had great seats for the game, in the lower level on the third base side of home plate. The weather was markedly better for the start of the game than the last time we were here. Instead of a raw day, with temperatures in the lower 40s and a wind off the lake (which Oil Can Boyd famously referred to as the ocean), it was clear and about 80 degrees for the first pitch. The warmer weather allowed us to enjoy the experience much more than 19 years ago.

The view from our seats. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The concessions in Progressive Field offered the standard fare for MLB parks, with plenty of concession stands, and reasonable prices. Typically, I would sample the hot dogs, as I do at almost all of our baseball stops. However, I passed this time, with memories of the greasy hot dogs at Canal Park still painfully fresh in my mind. Upon finding our seats, we found great sight lines and a generally unobstructed view of the field. Sitting fairly close to the field for an MLB park, I couldn’t shake the feeling that we were still far from the action. Attending many more minor league games over the past few years, we had become spoiled by the access they provide. This is not a knock on Progressive Field; almost all MLB parks feel this way. However, it did not detract from the charm of Progressive this night.

Francisco Linder and Yasiel Puig pausing before taking the field. Gotta love that Mohawk Puig was sporting. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The game was excellent, a tight affair as starters Mike Minor (Rangers) and Aaron Cevale (Indians) were in firmly command. The score was 1-0 Rangers going into the bottom of the 9th inning, when closer Jose Leclerc entered the game. A lead off triple by Jose Ramirez put Leclerc on the ropes. Seemingly unfazed, he retired the next three batter to notch the save.

Overall, it was a great game in a very nice ballpark. We took out time getting back to the car, since we were packed into the lot. To our pleasant surprise, the lot has cleared sufficiently to allow us a clean getaway from the park and out of Cleveland. Since we anticipated a late evening, we stayed in Independence one more night, after which we would continue our road trip, bound for Altoona, PA the next day

Ohio, August 3-4, 2019

August 3rd 2019: Akron, OH

The last road trip of the year was hastily prepared for the 1st week of August. Our target was Ohio and western Pennsylvania, adding two new Eastern League stadiums to our collection, as well as a return to a Cleveland for the first time in almost 20 years.

Departing central NJ early on the morning of August 3rd, we covered the distance to Akron Ohio in about 6 hours. Fortunately, the weather was good, and the traffic fairly light. The only stops along the way were for lunch in central Pennsylvania (a quick stop at a chain restaurant, rather than a local diner) and a fill up of the tank.

After a quick stop at the hotel, we headed out for the park. Arriving later than desired left little time to catch the first pitch. The home of the Akron RubberDucks is Canal Park, a ballpark nestled in downtown Akron. Parking is scattered around the park, and the task of finding suitable parking has hampered by extensive construction around the stadium. Arriving later than expected, we barely had time to find our seats before the National Anthem and the first pitch.

Canal Park just before game time Saturday, August 3rd, 2019 (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The stadium was packed for a Saturday night game, which featured the RubberDucks taking on the Binghamton Rumble Ponies (the AA affiliate of the New York Mets, our favorite MLB team). Typically, we conduct a quick tour of new ballparks before the game, soaking in the feel of the place, as well as take pictures. Since we arrived later than usual, we had no time to take in the ambience of the park. However, a quick look around the place showed that it was a beautiful ballpark, complete with a nice scoreboard and an urban vista over the right field wall. Being Hall of Fame weekend in Canton, the RubberDucks wore uniforms reminiscent of the ones worn by the Cleveland Browns.

Loquacious RubberDucks 1B Connor Marabell sporting the Brown inspired jersey. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

As for the game itself, the Rumble Ponies offense mustered only four hits, as the Akron RubberDucks beat the Rumble Ponies 3-0. Though we were rushed on our first encounter at Canal Park, we would get another chance to explore tomorrow afternoon.


August 4th 2019 Pro Football Hall of Fame

With the RubberDucks game scheduled at 205 pm, we decided to visit the Pro Football Hall of Fame in nearby Canton. We’d visited the Hall once before, in September 2009, on our way out to Detroit. The Hall of Fame Game had been played the night before, so we expected the Hall to be relatively quiet. However, the protocols for Hall of a Fame weekend were still in place, meaning we had to take a shuttle bus to the Hall from a nearby racecourse.

While wandering the Hall, I noticed two buses pulling up to the front of the Hall, and a few dozen men poured out of the buses. It was clear they were football players. Upon closer inspection, we discovered that it was the world champion New England Patriots. Not being a Patriots fan, I gave the team little notice, until sections of exhibits were closed to accommodate the players. Apparently, they were partaking in a tour of the facility, something unbeknownst to us (and based on the reactions of the other patrons, almost everyone else). Closing of exhibits with very little notice interfered with the visit, causing consternation among those in attendance.

Pro Football Hall of Fame (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes

Overall, this visit was not as satisfying as the 2009 visit. Aside from the inconveniences, the displays were not as impressive, and there were seemingly fewer of them than a decade ago. However, this is must see for any avid football fan.


August 4th 2019 Canal Park

Following lunch, we traveled to Canal Park for the RubberDucks 205 pm game versus the Rumble Ponies. The warm afternoon was perfect for baseball. While parking was once again difficult, we arrived well ahead of game time. This allowed us to explore the area around the park. The construction that hampered our parking efforts appeared to be part of a revitalization project.

Akron, OH near the ballpark. There was a considerable amount of construction underway. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Once inside the park on this warm and sunny day, we explored from foul pole to foul pole. Like many urban ballparks, Canal Park took advantage of its surroundings to enhance the experience. The result was a beautiful ballpark, more like a park we might see in a AAA town. The layout was somewhat like that of BB&T Park in Charlotte, North Carolina, dominated by cityscape in right field (though the vista is more impressive there).

Canal Park, Akron OH before the Sunday afternoon game. The light of day provided us a much better view of this beautiful ballpark. In fact, it is one of my favorite minor league stadiums.

Before the start of the game, we visited the team store. It contained the standard fare for minor league ballparks, at reasonable prices. Interestingly, a team photo was slipped into my shopping bag along with my purchases. It was a nice gesture, but it seemed odd to be given something, especially without asking first. Still, it WAS a nice picture, and I hung onto it, though I’m not sure why.

A freebie from the Akron RubberDucks

A visit to the concession stand was next. Visiting the stand on the first base side of the park (just above the section of our seats), I purchased hot dogs. Most ballparks serve fried hot dogs, and Canal Park was no exception. However, these dogs were particularly greasy, leaving me with an upset stomach. In fact, after this gastronomic experience, I have not had a single hot dog since.

As we have discovered to be typical, the crowd for the Sunday matinee was light, much less than for the Saturday night game. Our seats were better for this game, near first base. The seats were sun drenched, but fortunately it was not oppressively hot, as it can be in early August. Much like the night before, the anemic Rumble Ponies offense was shut out, this time on four hits. Losing two games like this is bad enough, but the more distressing thought (for Mets fans, anyway) is that there is but one blue chip prospect (SS Andres Gimenez, who had the day off) on the roster. This bodes poorly for the Mets’ future, with major league ready help still years away.

Following the game, we made the short trip to Cleveland for the next part of the road trip, staying in a hotel in Independence.