Yokohama, Sunday April 7th, 2019

The last stop on our 2019 stadium tour brought us to Yokohama Stadium, the home of the Yokohama DeNA BayStars. Unlike the previous stops on the tour, the weather was much more agreeable, with a hint of spring in the air.


1. Getting to the game

The cherry blossoms were in full bloom in Tokyo. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

We did not go straight from our hotel in Tokyo to the stadium. After walking through Tokyo (admiring the cherry blossoms), we headed out in search the Seibu Lions team store in the Ikebukuro section of Tokyo. We took the Marunouchi line from Tokyo Station to Ikebukuro station, a journey of about 20 minutes. After a few false starts, we found the Seibu Department Store. The Lions team store was located on the 8th floor. The team store was surprisingly small, but my brother was able to get a Lions jersey.

From the Ikebukuro station, we took the Fukutoshin line to the Nihon-Odori station, with the trip taking about 50 minutes. From the station, it was a short walk (about 400 meters) to Yokohama Stadium.


2. Yokohama Stadium

It was a beautiful afternoon at Yokohama Stadium, as the DeNA BayStars took on the Tokyo Yomiuri Giants. We arrived about an hour before the 13:00 start, which gave us time to explore the surroundings. Unlike most Japanese ball parks, there wasn’t much to see outside the park, so after a cursory look outside we entered the ballpark.

Quite intentionally, the BayStars team store was located just beyond the gate. Of course, we perused the store, purchasing apparel and a yearbook (completely in Japanese). Prices here were higher than other team stores. For example a Giant cap sold for nearly 10,000 yen (about $100 USD). Not yet possessing a Giants cap, I was tempted, but ultimately passed on the opportunity.

The information on the ticket was barely discernible, so we heeded advice given early on to show our tickets to team employees until they showed us our seats. We sat on the left field side, beyond third base in the lower level. Even an hour before the game, the stadium was packed (which we found to be true just about everywhere in Japan).

The view from our seats. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Just before of the start of the game, there was an audible murmur in the crowd, as a young man walked out to the mound to throw out to the first pitch. The crowd clearly knew who he was, though we didn’t have a clue. The young man was a member of a J-Pop band, whose name escapes me.

A celebrity throwing out the first pitch. We later learned he was a member of a J-Pop band. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The lineups were announced before the start of the game. Quite unexpectedly, the lineup announcements were in English, which was a first at an NPB game. In fact, the announcements sounded as though they were being made in an American ballpark. The English continued for each at bat, a nice touch for a foreign baseball fan. Unlike the other ballgames we saw in Japan, there were many foreign fans in attendance. Our entire row was comprised of Americans, except for the Giants fans sitting next to us.

Very MLB like scoreboard in Yokohama.

The visiting Giants had a large cheering section in left field (as is customary in Japan). The section sang a different song for each player. Being the third time we’d seen the Giants, we actually recognized the batters by the fight song chanted by the fans.

The Giants fans cheered loudly when the Giants were at bat, from the 1st inning through the 9th. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

Not to be outdone, the remainder of the stadium chanted for the BayStars in the bottom of the 1st inning. Having been to eight NPB games, it still amazes me that the fans have either stamina to maintain the cheering the entire game (want to hear the chanting? Check it out here.) The fans, the warm weather, and the ballpark made this my favorite stop on our NPB baseball tour (though my brother would disagree).

The BayStars fans cheering for their team. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The game itself was fairly one-sided, with the BayStars taking an early lead and holding on for a 5-1 victory. Rather than stretch during the middle of the 7th inning, the Japanese have another tradition we’ve seen at every ballpark so far. Fans inflated balloons and released them when instructed. The resulting display is quite colorful, and view a montage of balloon tradition is available here.

Like most other ball games in Japan, we saw some foreign players, though none of names were familiar. Seemingly, most of the foreign players were fireballers, with fastballs over 95 mph (a skill homegrown pitchers did not appear to possess on a consistent basis).

DeNA BayStars left hander Edwin Escobar. Escobar had brief stints with the Red Sox and Diamondbacks. (Photo credit: Jeff Hayes)

The game time was a reasonable two hours and 45 minutes, the shortest game we saw on this trip. Typically, NPB games last between three and three and one-half hours. However, unlike the US, nobody in Japan seems to mind. For the Japanese, baseball is more than a game; it’s an event.

The pageantry of NPB baseball. (Photo credit; Jeff Hayes)

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